Database

South Carolina coast, off

Other names:

What:
12/5/1775+; 3/15/1776+; 3/20/1776; 3/22/1776*; 4/24/1776; 5/19/1776, 2/13/1777; 2/27/1777, 4/21/1777; 5/8/1777, 6/5/1777*, 6/8/1778; 6/14/1777+; 6/17/1777*; 11/1777; 6/8/1778; 6/19/1778*; 7/15/1778; 8/6/1778+; 2/19/1779; 3/9/1779; 5/14/1779; 5/16-17/1779; 6/26/1779*; 9/11/1779^; 9/24/1779^; 10/1779*; 1/17/1780; 4/1/1780*; 8/1-6/1780; 8/7/1780*; 8/14/1780*; 11/1777; 9/6/1781* (victors: *American; +British; ^French)

Where: 32.531 -77.037 South Carolina coast, off

Maps: [map notes]

    Maps: [map notes]

    Sources:

    • Norman Desmarais, "Chronological List of Battles, Actions and Skirmishes" . Also see The Guide to the American Revolutionary War in South Carolina.
      coast, South Carolina, May 8, 1777
      coast, South Carolina, June 5, 1777
      coast, South Carolina, November 1777
      Charleston Coast, South Carolina, June 8, 1778
      coast, South Carolina, February 19, 1779
      coast, South Carolina, March 9, 1779
      coast, South Carolina, May 14, 1779
      coast, South Carolina, May 16-17, 1779
      August 1-6, 1780 Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina
      September 28, 1775 off Cummings Point, South Carolina.
      October 18, 1775, November 9, 1775, December 5, 1775 Rebellion Road, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina.
      November 10, 1775 Fort Johnson, South Carolina.
      April 24, 1776 off Cape Romain, South Carolina.

    • MyRevWar MyRevolutionaryWar.Com

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1775
        December 5, 1775 at Charlestown, South Carolina – On December 5, the HMS Scorpion captured 2 ships, the Hetty and the Thomas and Stafford at the mouth of Charlestown harbor. The Hetty would be made into a British warship and renamed HMS General Clinton. Conclusion: British Victory

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1776
        March 22, 1776 at Charlestown, South Carolina (USS Comet vs. HMS General Clinton) – On March 22, the USS Comet captured the sloop HMS General Clinton. This was the first time that the South Carolina Navy defeated a British warship. Conclusion: American Victory

        March 15, 1776 at Charlestown, South Carolina – On March 15, at sunrise, the frigate HMS Syren spotted an American ship that was carrying a Pennsylvania Artillery Company. The Syren chased the ship and soon fired a shot across its bow. The American ship stopped and surrendered without a fight. Conclusion: British Victory

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1777
        May 8, 1777 at South Carolina coast, South Carolina (USS St. Louis vs. HMS Industry) – ?

        June 5, 1777 at South Carolina coast, South Carolina (Privateer Union Captured) – On June 5, the privateer brig Union was on its way to Ireland when it was spotted by the Philadelphia privateer Lively, commanded by Capt. Woolman Sutton, off the South Carolina coast. The Lively captured the Union, put a crew aboard it, and sailed the Union to Charlestown. Conclusion: American Victory

        June 14, 1777 at Stono Inlet, South Carolina – On June 14, as the captured British privateer brig Union was approaching the mouth of the Charlestown Harbor, the frigates HMS Galatea and HMS Perseus spotted it. The Union was chased by the British ships when it suddenly ran aground at Stono Inlet. The crew abandoned the ship. A British tender sent out a few boats to capture the Union. They boarded the ship and then set it on fire. Conclusion: British Victory

        June 17 , 1777 at South Carolina coast, South Carolina (St. Louis vs. HMS Industry) – On June 17, the privateer St. Louis, commanded by Capt. Samuel Spencer, captured the HMS Industry. The Industry was then sent to Charlestown. Conclusion: American Victory

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1778
        June 19, 1778 at Charlestown, South Carolina – On June 19, the Connecticut brig Defence, commanded by Capt. Samuel Smedley, and the South Carolina sloop Volant, commanded by Capt. Oliver Daniel, sailed out from Charlestown Harbor to find the privateers in the area. By nightfall, they discovered a group of 3 St. Augustine privateers. Two of the privateer ships were captured, the Governor Tonyn’s Revenge and the Ranger. The third privateer, the Active, managed to escape. Conclusion: American Victory

        August 6, 1778 at Bull Island Bay, South Carolina (Revenge vs. Charlotte) – On August 6, the British privateer Revenge chased the schooner Charlotte into Bull Island Bay near Charlestown. The Charlotte ran aground and was quickly captured. Conclusion: British Victory

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1779
        June 26, 1779 at Stono River, South Carolina – On June 26, the brigs USS Notre Dame, USS Bellona, brigatine USS Beaufort, and 4 South Carolina Navy armed ships attacked 7 British ships that were bringing supplies to Gibbe’s Plantation. Of the British fleet, 2 ships were captured, 1 was blown up, and the remainder of them fled the area. Conclusion: American Victory

        September 11, 1779 at Charlestown Bar, State (l’Amazone vs. HMS Ariel) – On September 11, the frigate HMS Ariel was captured by the French frigate l’Amazone, commanded by Lt. Count de La Perouse. The naval battle lasted for about an hour. Conclusion: French Victory

        September 24, 1779 at Hilton Head, South Carolina – The Man of War HMS Experiment, commanded by Capt. Sir James Wallace, lost its masts and bowspirit in a gale and became stranded. In the same area, the French frigate Lively learned that the British ships had seperated from the Experiment during the storm. Three French ships were dispatched to find the Experiment. On September 24, the Experiment was near Hilton Head where she met up with the store ship HMS Cartel Champion and a victualer HMS Myrtle. At 3:45 P.M., the Experiment spotted the 3 French ships and tried to put as much distance between them. At 4:30 P.M., 2 more French ships were spotted by the Experiment. At 8:00 P.M., the 2 ships hoisted French colors and closed with the Experiment. The French ship Sagittair, commanded by Capt. d’Albert de Rions, fired two broadsides at the Experiment. The Experiment managed to put some distance between the ships. At 8:30 P.M., Wallace decided to fight back and re-entered the combat area. After firing a few shots at the French, the mast of the Experiment was shot off. This forced the Experiment to surrender. Conclusion: French Victory

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1780
        April 1, 1780 at South Carolina coast, South Carolina (Fair American vs. Elphinstone and Arbuthnot) – On April 1, the South Carolina State Navy ship Fair American, commanded by Capt. Charles Morgan, teamed up with the Privateer Argo and was able to capture the two Privateer brigs, Elphinstone and Arbuthnot. The Loyalist ships were from New York and had been bound for St. Kitts. Conclusion: American Victory

        October 7, 1780 at Charlestown, South Carolina (Fair American vs. HMS Rodney) – On October 7, the South Carolina ship Fair American joined with the Privateer Holker. Together, they captured the brig HMS Rodney. The Rodney was bound for Charlestown. Conclusion: American Victory

        October 14, 1780 at Charlestown, South Carolina (Fair American vs. HMS Richard) – On October 14, the South Carolina ship Fair American joined with the Privateer Holker. Together, they captured the brig HMS Richard. Conclusion: American Victory

      • Revolutionary War naval Minor Engagements 1781
        September 6, 1781 off the coast of Charlestown, South Carolina (USS Congress vs. HMS Savage) – On September 6, the British naval sloop, HMS Savage, was cruising off the coast of Charleston. The Savage was commanded by Capt. Charles Stirling. He noticed an approaching ship that they thought was a privateer. He let the ship get close to the Savage. By the time he realized what the ship was, it was too late. The supposed privateer was actually the USS Congress. The Congress was a Philadelphia privateer, commanded by Capt. George Geddes, which contained 20 12-lb. cannon on the main deck and 4 6-lb. cannon above. The Savage began the naval battle. The fierce battle lasted over 4 hours before the Savage was forced into submission. The Savage had hermizenmast shot away, the main mast was torn, and the ship was on fire in several places. The crew of the Congress boarded the Savage in 3 different places with only 40 British sailors on deck to defend against the Congress. Around 2:45 P.M., Stirling had no choice but to surrender the Savage to Geddes and the Congress. Not too much later, the Savage was captured by the Britsh frigate, HMS Solebay. Conclusion: American Victory Casualties: American: 11 killed. 30 wounded; British: 8 killed, 6 wounded

    • RevWar75 RevWar75  
    • Mar 1776 listing 3/20/1776 Atlantic Ocean, near Charlestown. Draw.
    • Mar 1776 listing 3/22/1776 Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina coast SC. Insufficient data.
    • Apr 1776 listing 4/24/1776 off Cape Roman. Insufficient data.
    • May 1776 listing 5/19/1776 Atlantic Ocean, near Charlestown Bar. Draw.
    • Feb 1777 listing 2/13/1777 Atlantic Ocean, near Charlestown Harbor. Insufficient data.
    • Feb 1777 listing 2/27/1777 Atlantic Ocean, near Charlestown Harbor. Insufficient data.
    • Apr 1777 listing 4/21/1777 Atlantic Ocean, near Charlestown Harbor. Insufficient data.
    • June 1778 listing 6/8/1778 Charlestown Coast. Draw.
    • June 1778 listing 6/19/1778 Atlantic Ocean, off Charlestown Harbor. American victory
    • July 1778 listing 7/15/1778 Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina coast. Insufficient data.
    • Aug 1778 listing 8/6/1778 Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina coast. Insufficient data.
    • Sep 1779 listing 9/11/1779 Atlantic Ocean, near Charlestown Bar. Insufficient data.
    • Oct 1779 listing 10/1779 Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina coast. American victory.
    • Jan 1780 listing 1/17/1780 off Tybee. Insufficient data.
    • Apr 1780 listing 4/1/1780 Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina coast. American victory.
    • Sep 1781 listing 9/6/1781 off Charlestown; Congress - HM Sloop Savage. American victory

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    11-30-16