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Cape Clear, off

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Where: 51.077 -9.110 Cape Clear, off

Maps: [map notes]

  • 51.077 -9.110 Cape Clear, off
  • Google. Click "out" 5 times.
  • Mapquest. Click "out" 2 times.
  • Wikimapia. Go to W. longitude location. Click X immediately above to clear panel.

Sources:

  • Archive Allen, Gardner Weld, A Naval History of the American Revolution, Vol.I, Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press Cambridge, 1913. Scanned by Google. Ocr'd to make full-text searchable by JR. p.341
    Also, here.
    From Quiberon Bay the Ranger proceeded to Brest, arriving below the town March 8. The fleet of Admiral d'orvilliers was at that time lying in the harbor of Brest. In this vicinity the Ranger remained a month and again saluted the French flag, rewiving eleven guns in return for thirteen. April 10 she sailed on a cruise in British waters. On the 14th, between Scilly and Cape Clear, a brigantine was taken and sunk, and on the 17th, off Dublin, a ship was captured which Jones sent back to Brest.

  • Archive Allen, Gardner Weld, A Naval History of the American Revolution, Vol.II. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, The Riverside Press Cambridge, 1913. Scanned by Google. Ocr'd to make full-text searchable by JR. P.450
    Also, here.
    On the 23d, the squadron was off Cape Clear. Two prizes had been taken since leaving port and sent back to L'Orient. A third waa now taken by bob, there being no wind. In the evening, as it was still calm, Jones sent hie barge ahead to tow the Bonhomme Richard, fearing she might be swept by the tide into a dangerous position. "Soon after sunset," says the commodore, the villains who towed the ship, cut the tow rope and decamped with my barge. Sundry shots were fired to bring them to without effect; in the meantime the master of the Bon homme Richard, without orders, manned one of the ships boats and with four soldiers pursued the barge, in order to stop the deeerters. The evening was clam and serene, but the d of that officer, Mr. Cutting Lunt, induced him to pursue too far, and a fog which atme on Boon aftemrds prevented the boats from rejoining the ship, although I mused signal guns to be frequently fired. The fog and calm continued the next day till towards evening. In the afternoon Capt. Landaia came on board the Bon homme Riabard and be haved towards me with great disrespect, aibming in the most indelicate manner and language that I had lost my boats and people through my imprudence in sending boats to take a, prize. He persisted in his reproaches, though he was assured . . . that the barge was towing the ship at the time of e l o p ment and that she had not been sent in pursuit of the prize. He was affronted because I would not the day before suffer him to chase without my orders and to approach the dangerous shore I have already mentioned, where he was an entire stranger and when there was not sufficient wind to govern a ship. He told me he was the only American in ,the squadron and was determined to follow his own opinion in ohasing when and where he thought proper, and in every other matter that concerned the service, and that if I continued in that sitnation three days longer, the squadron would be taken."

  • RevWar75 RevWar75  
    Not found.

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12-13-16