Database

Below Monck's Corner (Fairlawn?)

Other names:

What:
American Col. Maham captured 80 Brits within sight of the British army, 16 Oct 1782 [probably 17 Nov 1781] (PJO)

Where: 33.1929073, -79.9876186, Fairlawn ("below Monck's Corner")

Maps: [map notes]

  • 33.1929073 -79.9876186, "below Monck's Corner" (Fairlawn?)
  • ACME Mapper.
  • National Map
  • Google
  • Confidence: 5(for Fairlawn), 3(for "below Monck's Corner")

Sources:

  • NBBAS:Four p.97
    Monck’s Corner, South Carolina
    Siege of Charlestown
    16 October 1782
    This incident is mentioned in the pension account of William McIntosh. He wrote that he was "with Col. Maham when he took upwards of eighty prisoners in the sight of the British army below Monck’s Corner on the 16th of October in the year 1782. He served in Captain James McCauley’s troop of militia horse."

  • Pension Application Of William McIntosh S9424, Transcribed by Will Graves
    . . . 30th day of October 1832 . . .

    [W]as at the Battle of Eutaw Springs on the 8th of September.
    [W]as with Colonel Maham when he took upwards of eighty prisoners in sight of the British Army below Monk’s [sic, Moncks] Corner on the 16th of October.
    In the year 1782 he served in Captain James McColley’s [sic, James McCauley's ?] Troop of Militia horse.

    [JR note: "16th of October" logically follows "8th of September" immediately preceding. Eutaw Springs occurred in 1781. James book (following) had been published approximately 12 years before this affidavit was given. Note sentence break between "16th of October" and "In the year 1782".]

  • William Dobein James, A Sketch of the Life of Brig. Gen. Francis Marion
    Col. Maham having now raised and equipped part of his cavalry, passed the Santee, burnt some British stores in the house of Sir John Colleton, at Fairlawn, and took some prisoners. On the 16th of October, Gen. Greene writes to Marion, "Col. Maham's success is highly honourable to himself and corps, and I hope will be followed by future strokes of good fortune." This hope was not realized. A letter from Col. Doyle, of the British, shows strongly what different views, men engaged on opposite sides, will take of the same transaction. It is to Gen. Marion: "Sir, I am directed by Brigadier Gen. Stewart, to represent to you an outrage that has been committed by a party of your corps, under the command of Col. Maham, upon a parcel of sick, helpless soldiers in an hospital at Colleton house, on the morning of the 17th inst. The burning an hospital, and dragging away a number of dying people to expire in swamps, is a species of barbarity hitherto unknown in civilized warfare. The general expects that those unhappy sufferers will be sent immediately as prisoners upon parole. Attacks on hospitals are, among your own continental army, unprecedented. The hospital at Camden was by Gen. Greene's order protected, although it had an armed guard for its internal police." Gen. Greene, who ere this, the reader must have perceived, was polite to his friends, and humane to his enemies, for even they are obliged to confess it, immediately instituted an inquiry into this complaint;* but how it was accommodated cannot now be ascertained.

    -- * Greene's letter, 24th Nov. --

    [JR note: James gives the date of Fairlawn as 16 October 1781 (or before). Doyle gives it as 17 October 1781.]

  • John Belton O'Neall Landrum. Colonial and Revolutionary History of Upper South Carolina:, 1897, Shannon and Co., p.399
    After the action at Eutaw Springs, the Americans retired to their former position on the high hills of Santee, while the British took position in the vicinity of Monk's Corner. The active partisans on the American side still kept alive their blows on the detached convoys of the enemy at different places. On one occasion, Colonel Maham, with a small party of American cavalry, took upwards of eighty prisoners within sight of the British camp. Says Ramsey : " The British no more acted with their usual vigor. On the slightest appearance of danger, they discovered a disposition to flee scarcely inferior to what was exhibited a year before by the American militia." By the end of October, the intelligence of the surrender of Yorktown reached Greene's army.
    [JR note. Implied: After Eutaw Springs (8 Sep 1781) but before end of 1781. Nearly an exact quote from Ramsay, following]

  • David Ramsay, Ramsay's History of South Carolina: From Its First Settlement in 1670 to the ..., 1858 W. J. Duffie, p.249
    After the action at the Eutaws, the Americans retired to their former position on the high hills of Santee, and the British took post in the vicinity of Monk's Corner. While they lay there, a small party of American cavalry, commanded by Colonel Maham,took upwards of eighty prisoners, within sight of their main army. The British no more acted with their usual vigor. On the slightest appearance of danger, they discovered a disposition to flee scarcely inferior to what was exhibited the year before by the American militia.

    [This is followed immediately by the following section]
    SECTION XI.
    Campaign of 1782.

    [JR note. Implied: After Eutaw Springs (8 Sep 1781) but before end of 1781.]

  • Sherman's Calendar....

    p.462

    16 October [1781]. [skirmish] Monck’s Corner (Berkeley County) Boatner[p.711]: "According to [Newton A.] Strait, a Col. Malone (not identified in Heitman) attacked the British camp and took 80 prisoners."2785

    2785 Newton A. Strait, Alphabetical List of Battles, 1754-1900, Washington, 1900, BEA [(Boatner) Encyclopedia of the American Revolution] p. 711.

    p.462
    16 October [1781]. [skirmish] Monck’s Corner (Berkeley County) Boatner[p.711]: "According to [Newton A.] Strait, a Col. Malone (not identified in Heitman) attacked the British camp and took 80 prisoners."2785

    2785 Newton A. Strait, Alphabetical List of Battles, 1754-1900, Washington, 1900, BEA [(Boatner) Encyclopedia of the American Revolution] p. 711.

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  • John Wesley Wells. Compiled by Newton A. Strait, An Alphabetical List of the Battles of the War of the Rebellion, with Dates ..., 1878, J. H. Soulé, p.81
    1781 October 16. Monk's Corner. British army encamped near this place. Col. Malone attacked a detachment, taking 80 prisoners.
  • RevWar75 RevWar75  
  • Sep 1781 listing
    8 Sep 1781 Eutaw Springs
    9 Sep 1781 Monck's Corner Road
    29 Sep 1781 Yorktown begins
  • Oct 1781 listing
    10/16/1781 Monck's Corner American victory [Boatner]
    19 Oct 1781 Yorktown ends
  • Nov 1781 listing Fairlawn 17 Nov 1781 [per Widmer, O'Kelley]. Boatner, shown as ref. gives date as 27 Nov 1781.
  • Dec 1781 listing
  • Oct 1782 listing: Not found

Related locations:
Fair Lawn [Probably same action]

Confidence level: See above.